(Ch. 9) Response Post due: Wednesday, Nov. 2 before noon.

Response Post due: Wednesday, Nov. 2 before noon.

Engage in all chapter 9 materials:

Types of Horror Filmsskull2a

What Makes Horror?

What is a Mystery Film?

It’s a Real Small World After All

Blogging, Reviewing for Free or $$$

YouTube, Soundcloud & Twitter Reviews

 

Address two of the following questions:

  1. Which end of the horror spectrum do you fall? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
  2. Some say that certain suspense films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings, defend why that statement could be true.
  3. What did you find most interesting about the international film market? Why?
Advertisements

21 Comments Add yours

  1. 1. Which end of the horror spectrum do you fall? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I am usually drawn to psychological (suspense) thrillers or Demons/Demon Possession films, while I typically stay away from slasher films. I love movies that make you think and movies that have you on the edge of your seat, nervous about how the plot will turn out; this obviously makes me drawn towards psychological thrillers. Movies involving the supernatural always intrigue me, especially because I want to know how they portray the forces of good vs. evil in the universe. On the other hand, slasher movies have never held my interest for very long. The films often involve stupid, unrealistic decisions made by the victims, and the “slasher” character never ever ever dies (nor does he die in the subsequent 20 sequels made by the studio). This makes me feel as if the story doesn’t actually resolve, and makes it difficult for me to place myself in the shoes of the characters.

    3. What did you find most interesting about the international film market? Why?

    Americans have a tendency to think we’re the best country (sometimes we think we’re the only country) and I have fallen into that trap as well. That being said, it is eye opening to read that we aren’t even the number one film industry in the world. There is so much more outside the country that affects film. A great example of this was the recent film, “Warcraft.” The film did terribly domestically (less than $25 million on opening weekend against a $200 million budget) and this caused me to assume it was a dud that would never get its money back, let alone receive a sequel. However, the film has grossed over $433 million worldwide, and filmmakers are in talks about future films. This really showed me what a big impact the world has on film and filmmaking, not just America.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Thanks for offering this Christian in relation to demon/supernatural films – “I want to know how they portray the forces of good vs. evil in the universe.”

      American used to be number one in box-office numbers but that is definitely changing.

      Like

  2. jguberman242 says:

    1) Which end of the horror spectrum do you fall? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I’m drawn to multiple of the horror categories. I enjoy a well-executed psychological thriller, but I also love movies in the “ghouls, ghosts, and unexplained phenomenon” category. I even like monster movies, but I prefer vampire and zombie movies over werewolves, mummies, etc. As far as slasher films go, I enjoy them if they have a psychological aspect. I love the first Saw movie because it wasn’t excessively gory, there were plot twists, psychological aspects, a backstory, etc. Once the franchise was taken on by other producers, the Saw series (unfortunately) turned into what a lot of people refer to as “torture porn,” or bloody violence for the sake of twisted enjoyment. I don’t like watching people get tortured (even though it’s staged)– it’s the story behind some slasher films that draws me into them.
    Some of my favorite horror movies are: “The Forest,” “Woman in Black,” “Saw” (the first one), and “Oculus.”

    I’ll at least try most types of horror films, but I will not watch “torture porn” (I won’t watch “Hostel” or “Human Centipede”), and I don’t watch demon/possession movies (such as “The Exorcist”). Those movies are off-limits for me.

    2) Some say that certain suspense films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings, defend why that statement could be true.

    For the sake of easier analysis of this question, I want to pick one specific film that is categorized as a suspense film. This year, a movie was released called “The Shallows,” starring Blake Lively. “The Shallows” is categorized as a suspense film, though I thoroughly believe that it can be considered a horror film as well.
    1) The protagonist confronts fear when she is stuck in the ocean with a territorial shark, and she has no resources.
    2) The character is flawed– she sometimes trips, makes bad decisions out of fear, etc.
    3) Her individual choice to keep surfing once her friends left can be considered the inciting incident.
    4) There are a handful of people in the world with an extreme fear of sharks or even deep ocean water– this movie plays into their fears.
    5) “Horror is best served when an audience and the characters explore the unknown together”– what’s more unknown than deep ocean water with a shark lurking below where you can see him?
    6) Horror exists alongside hope– the protagonist has a few windows for opportunities to escape, but she has to be strategic and quick. Often, she’s unsuccessful, but there’s still hope throughout the movie.
    There are countless films in existence that are traditionally labelled as “suspense” films that can easily fit the key characteristics of horror films.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Why do you stay away from the “possession” films Jen?

      Perfect defense of suspense being horror and using “The Shallows” as an example. Excellent. NTMII

      Like

      1. jguberman242 says:

        I think I stay away from possession films because of my religious background. I don’t believe in ghosts, vampires, etc. However, I believe demons exist, and I don’t like the idea of watching movies about them because it’s above the level of scary that I go for.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. kmanning2 says:

    2. Some say that certain suspense films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings, defend why that statement could be true.

    I definitely think that suspense films can combine with the horror category. In fact, many horror movies use suspense as a technique and vice versa. In the Chapter 9 reading “What is a mystery film,” it says that suspense “can be done through the use of the sound track, camera angles, heavy shadows, and surprising plot twists.” Many horror movies utilize these aspects, especially the sound track and heavy shadows. Scary music or creatures emerging out of the darkness is a staple of most horror films.

    3. What did you find most interesting about the international film market? Why?

    I found it really interesting, as well as surprising, that some films are edited before being distributed overseas, whether that be through adding characters of a different culture or taking out references that might be offensive. Honestly, I think it’s genius. There’s more of a chance that the movie will resonate with the overseas audiences and that they will want to come back for more. On the other hand, if the movie kept the offensive references or had cultural cues that the audience wouldn’t understand, it might turn them off from imported movies. These edited films provide more opportunities for international success.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Nice thoughts Kathryn exploring the “techniques” comparison.

      For international audiences -if you insult them you can guarantee you won’t find success. Many films actually add storylines that will appeal to international audiences .

      Like

  4. Mallory Moore says:

    1. Which end of the horror spectrum do you fall? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?
    I tend to enjoy psychological thrillers. I’ve heard a lot of people say that they actually don’t like these since they are more likely to reflect real life than a horror movie about supernatural events (only if you don’t believe in those supernatural things, of course). But I tend to see the psychological thrillers as generally better quality than other horror films. I think they can be really well thought out, and I love the way they play with your mind. As an English major, one of my favorite genres to study is gothic literature. I love the symbolism it uses to represent the human mind, and I think that psychological horror does this a lot too. For example, the use of the giant, intricate hotel and the confusing hedge maze in The Shining is pretty cool.
    I guess I have a lot of baggage when it comes to slasher films, because my parents really don’t like them, so as I was growing up they would always imply that horror films were demonic, and that the scariness and blood was unnecessary. I don’t really agree with them in every case. There are probably some slasher films that I would really enjoy and appreciate, I just haven’t gotten into them yet since I was raised in that way.
    2. What did you find most interesting about the international film market? Why?

    I think it’s interesting, but it also makes a lot of sense, that action driven films are the most popular in the international market, and not dialogue driven films or comedies. My parents went to the Metropolitan opera for one of their anniversaries, and the opera they saw was in German. The back of the seats in front of you at the Metropolitan have little screens that will translate the opera for you so you can follow along. But they said that a German speaking family was sitting near them and kept laughing at jokes that didn’t translate well, or at all, into English, so my parents didn’t get the jokes. I can see this happening in films too. Maybe certain bits of dialogue are so carefully crafted in one language that it would be really hard to keep the same impact when translated.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      gothic literature = big fan! In many ways Alien has been compared to Gothic Horror.

      Great comparison on translation of humor -that’s wonderful. Thanks Mallory

      Like

  5. alicebyrd20 says:

    If the horror spectrum was on a scale of 1-10, with 10 being the scariest, I’m absolutely drawn to the 10. I love horror movies and typically will watch any. I love all the genres and I know that sounds crazy. When it comes to monsters, zombies are my favorite (Dawn of The Dead, the original Night of the Living Dead). Paranormal Activity (only the first one) and the original Poltergeist fall in with Ghouls, Ghosts and Unexplained. I love a classic slasher, like the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre or The Hills Have Eyes. In the Witches and Curses category, I’m a big fan of the original Blair Witch as well as the recent reboot. The Shining and Silence of the Lambs will forever be two of my absolute favorites when it comes to psychological thrillers. There really isn’t a category that I stay away from, except maybe for movies like The Human Centipede. Horror films that are grossly scary (i.e. attaching humans butt to mouth) just for the “deranged scientist” gory element don’t really draw me in – that comes across as gimmicky, like 13-year old boy horror movie material.
    I’d say that some suspense films can cross into the horror category. In life, horror isn’t always a serial killer, a ghost, a witch, or a demonic possession. Horror comes from real, tangible things and our own feelings, which is why suspense movies can turn into horror movies really fast. Sometimes a good horror movie isn’t that at all – what makes it truly scary is the element of reality – the character(s) may not be fighting against some supernatural entity, or some specific villain, but rather a fear, anxiety, or situation within their own life they can’t control. I think a lot of audiences relate to that because we have similar fears as humans. A classic example of this is Hitchcock’s The Birds. The film, roughly, focuses on birds that swarm and attack individuals without warning. Not only is that terrifying, but it’s a classic example of something we take for granted (most people generally assume relatively “tame” animals like birds aren’t going to attack) turning on us. Good suspense movies play on our assumptions that the things we take for granted (like a collective sense of security and safety, as well as standard societal expectations of behavior) and turn them around so that we are no longer “safe” in our own world. This is where horror forms in a suspense film – when the characters can no longer assume basic things to be true within their familiar world.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Alice -With your love of Horror (most types) maybe you should start writing a “horror movie blog” or submit material to Moviepilot.

      Wonderful thoughts on horror and suspense -I especially thought that this captures it so well: “the element of reality ” and “Good suspense movies play on our assumptions that the things we take for granted (like a collective sense of security and safety.” Wonderful – NTMII

      Like

  6. ssevert says:

    Which end of the horror spectrum do you fall? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I absolutely despise horror films. Always have and probably always will. I don’t like being kept on the edge of my seat and biting my nails. Way to stressful for me. I can deal with some suspense in movies such as “Taken” or like Jen mentioned “The Shallows” but don’t care for the gore in “Slasher” films or the absolute evil in “Psychological Thrillers”. It takes a lot to get me to watch a true horror film. I will do almost anything to avoid them.

    What did you find most interesting about the international film market? Why?

    I found it interesting that the U.S. isn’t even close to being largest market for feature films. I would have never guessed India sells over 3.3 billion annually. That’s insane. I didn’t realize that Hollywood would actually have to make adaptations for the global market. Like Christian said above, I think that as Americans sometimes we think we are the best and the only ones around. That just isn’t true and I think it’s something the film industry has to work with in order to be successful.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Horror films -many people feel the same way as you on this one.

      The US thinks it owns the world many times (and it once did in film-making $$$) but no more. We’re now playing catch up.

      Like

  7. 1. Generally, I am not a big horror fan. I don’t really like to be scared, grossed out, or to watch the characters get picked off one by one. However, if anything, I think I would generally find the psychological thrillers to be interesting. Meanwhile, I have enjoyed some of the films that fall into other categories, like “The Sixth Sense.” Also, because of the ‘mummy’ category is mentioned in the ‘Monsters’ sub-genre, I should include that I have always enjoyed “The Mummy” series. However, it may be that I appreciate the development of the characters in movies like the ones mentioned above. For the most part, the categories I am likely to avoid are slasher, demon possession, and witches/ curses. While these films (especially slasher) might be less likely to make you care about the characters, there is also the common element in demon movies where the evil in question enters a child, like in “Ouija,” which is especially disturbing.
    3. The aspect of the foreign film market that surprised me the most was that more scenes are sometimes added to films, such as in the case of “Iron Man 3.” Especially since these scenes added in characters and scenes specific to China, its country of release. Since these scenes likely did not involve the main characters of the movie, it almost seems like they would detract a little from the main plot, even taking the audience out of the story a little. However, I have seen comparisons before related to animated Disney movies. For example, the newscaster in “Zootopia” is apparently a different animal in almost every different region of release. Likewise, in “Inside Out,” when baby Riley dislikes the vegetables that she is offered by her parents, the type of vegetable varies by what children in each country tend to dislike. It would certainly be interesting to view these alternative releases to see if the film feels any different because of the changes.

    Like

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Yeah -I agree. You don’t see a ton of character development in the slasher (or the like) films. Creepy children in films … creeps me out.

      Great thoughts about Zootoopia & Inside Out

      Like

  8. brittany parker says:

    Which end of the horror spectrum do you fall? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I don’t like horror films, so for me personally, I’d rather watch a film that falls in the line of ‘monsters’ because to me, those tend to not be as scary. I don’t like watching horror films that are very realistic, because those tend to scare me the most because I’m thinking in the back of my head, ‘this could happen to me’.

    Some say that certain suspense films cross into the horror category. After engaging in the readings, defend why that statement could be true.

    Suspense films can most definitely cross into the horror category. This is because a horror film is simply a film where the protagonists will confront their fears, and this is something that can very well happen in a suspense film. I believe that the majority of suspense films have a horror side to them, because the majority have some type of conflict that deals with fear and tragedy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      I love this -“I don’t like watching horror films that are very realistic, because those tend to scare me the most because I’m thinking in the back of my head, ‘this could happen to me’.” – So true, so true for many.

      “Facing fears” – great point. Thanks Brittany

      Like

  9. thoyle1 says:

    1. I would say that I am most drawn to a good suspense or psychological thriller, though I don’t mind blood or gore, as long as there is a point to it. I have never been a big fan of the films that are full of blood and monsters with no storyline to go with it. I enjoy a scary film that makes me think and keeps me on the edge of my seat. Some of my favorites are Signs, The Forest, and The Village.

    2. I think that it is true that many suspense films can also be considered horror. One recent film I can think of that fits this category is the new film Ouija: Origins of Evil. It had both suspenseful and horror components in it. I would imagine it is hard to keep to a suspense movie without crossing over into horror. M. Night Shyamalan has done a good job staying at just suspenseful without crossing over the line into Horror with most of his films.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. noeltmanning says:

      Signs, The Forest, and The Village – these films appealed to me as well.

      Great points with M. Night Shyamalan & Ouija: Origins of Evil

      Like

  10. 1. Which end of the horror spectrum do you fall? What horror films are you drawn to, or which ones do you stay away from? Why?

    I do not fall on the horror scale at all. I do not watch horror films in any capacity be they suspense, slasher, demonic, etc. I do not process them well as reality can turn darker than any movie in a heartbeat. I avoid all horror movies with the utmost care. While i will watch suspensful action movies such as Taken or Inception I do not view those as horror. To me, horror is what hides in the darkness of the human mind. I believe it should stay there and never come to light.

    3.What did you find most interesting about the international film market? Why?

    How do movies make it from one country to the next? and why do they not make it to other countries? How do the tastes of different countries effect how a movie does there? That is what got my attention the most. The cultural differences that decide how the movie does. For big name movies in the USA, with a lot of star power, that do well on home territory, may completely fail on the international market. And movies that do well in say Japan on Germany may never even hit screens in the United States. What makes that happen and why such things occur interested me most about the international film market.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. noeltmanning says:

    Ben – Intersting perspective: “To me, horror is what hides in the darkness of the human mind. I believe it should stay there and never come to light.” – Thanks for sharing.

    International cultures differ in the likes and dislikes – and that impacts the successes and failures of films on a global scale.

    Thanks Benjamin

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s